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Sunday, December 16, 2018

Risky distance - University 23

I introduce 2011 kanto preliminary student championship quarter final match.

The red player was Ishii belonged to Kokushikan university and white player was Murakami belonged to Tsukuba university.
As for first kaeshi-Do of red player, I admitted ippon if I was a judge. It was not very clear hit, but white player’s Do was completely unguarded at a moment and this Do was perfect timing.

At 1:47, red player hit Kote. He aimed at white player’s careless point, and at that moment his Kote became unguarded in a risky distance.

In this match, they played closer distance in several situations. I focused on their “maai” (playing distance between players). Maai is very difficult, if it is too far, you cannot hit and if too closer it is also difficult to hit. The problem is proper distance for somebody is also proper for opponent player, which happened in many cases.

So, white player tried to pressure and attack around 2:20, but red player countered Men at 2:23. It was not admitted ippon, but it meant it was also convenient distance to hit for red player.

At 3:21, red player also aimed to Kote, however this time white player’s momentum dominated and red player delayed reaction a bit. As a result, white player decided Men and back to score tie.

After that, they became a little cautious not to be hit by other and extra inning of the match came.

5:11, red player tried to search white player’s target place, but white player was careful enough and red player stopped at a loss in a risky distance. There, white player didn’t miss the chance and stroked powerful Men.


In closer distance to opponent player, you might have chances, but don’t forget your opponent also have chances as same. So, “watch out especially you feel you have a chance” is a take home message today.

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